Monastery de
Alcobaca

Gallery of the Monastery of Alcobaça. Click on a picture to enlarge it.

click for larger view

Wonderful entrance to this 12th century monastery. Built where the rivers Alcoa and Baca meet.

click for larger view

- and its huge. This is the frontage, the side are 50% longer.

click for larger view

Central nave of the church. Built during 12th and completed in the 13th century. Its as new looking and pristine as it must have been 700 years ago.

click for larger view

Dizzying heights of the central nave. Probably over 30m tall.

click for larger view

The ornate tomb of King Pedro I, a masterpiece of 14th century tomb sculpting.

click for larger view

As with King Pedro's, Dona Ines de Castro, the King's lover, also has a richly decorated tomb. Scenes tell stories of their life together.

click for larger view

Inside of the Cloisters of King Dinis. Here the monks could walk around the 4 sides of the quadrangle shielded from both sun and rain. They took a vow of silence so this would still be a quiet place.

click for larger view

Looking into the inner courtyard of the Cloisters of King Dinis. Also called The Cloisters of Silence.

click for larger view

One of the oldest parts of the monastery, this was originally the monks dormitory though later, when the monastery was expanded, it became the guests quarters..

click for larger view

Not open to the public, this is the Cardinals' cloisters. Quite splendid to look out upon but very noisy due to the resident frogs, who clearly haven't taken a vow of silence.

click for larger view

A confusing picture! It's the chimney above the kitchens (picture below) and I'd estimate it to be over 15m tall.

click for larger view

Looking across the cloisters to the twin towers over the church entrance..

click for larger view

Here is the bottom of the chimney directly above the fires. Racks above the fires enable pans or meats to be hung, so boiled or roasted. The hearth is 3m x 5m.

click for larger view

Monks refectory. On the left are steps up to a pulpit from which the scriptures were read at meal times.

click for larger view

The beaufully ornate Lavatorium, just outside of the refectory. Hand washing?

Return to top